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Printed Web in Providence

Providence, RI launch of Printed Web #1 at The Design Office

Providence, RI launch of Printed Web #1 at The Design Office

Providence, RI launch of Printed Web #1 at The Design Office

https://www.flickr.com/photos/soulellis/with/13426967485

Providence, RI launch of Printed Web #1 at The Design Office

Providence, RI launch of Printed Web #1 at The Design Office

The Design Office graciously hosted a Providence, RI launch for Printed Web #1 on March 17. Lots of RISD students and faculty were there and we had an inspiring discussion about the work with Clement Valla and Benjamin Shaykin. These terrific photos are by Sarah Verity.

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Rauði Klefinn

the reading

Starting the reading of 530 for our self-organized group show “Rauði Klefinn” in the red fish freezer at Skagaströnd harbor, 23 August 2013. Photo by Liz Dunn. Darr Tah Lei’s view (she filmed the entire thing, which I’ll post if/when I edit it). More here.

Paul Soulellis "530 (Sá veldur sem á heldur)"

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The Book Affair

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↑ David Horvitz hiding.

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↑ AA Bronson.

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↑ My talk.

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↑ Photos above by Automatic Books.

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Here are some scenes (and lots more) from Automatic Books‘ The Book Affair, a three-day book fair during the opening of the Venice Biennale. Unlike the larger, more well-known fairs, this was small, intimate, casual and every single table was of remarkable quality. There were presentations by Giorgio Maffei, Dexter Sinister and David Horvitz in the evenings and ongoing talks throughout the two days, including mine. We got lots of traffic, even in the rain. Reactions to Library of the Printed Web were really satisfying, which has got me thinking about what to do next. I have to admit that I much preferred presenting and selling other artists’ work, rather than my own. It’s becoming obvious that one idea is to work directly with some of the artists in the collection to produce new work, either as a publisher and/or in a physical space (gallery). Lots to think about for the fall…

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Ed Ruscha at the New York Public Library

I was lucky enough to be in the audience on March 6 when Ed Ruscha appeared at the New York Public Library for a conversation with Paul Holdengräber. Ed was in town for the opening of Ed Ruscha, Books & Co. the evening before. Here is the full recording (1 hr. 40 min.), posted by Live from the NYPL.

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46 books in a cabinet

Recently, I rolled Library of the Printed Web up Fifth Avenue to CUNY Graduate Center for a presentation at Theorizing the Web 2013.

Unlike the online experience of art (fast, ephemeral), Library of the Printed Web presents itself as a slow scene—a tableau vivant of found photography and texts from the web. The components—table, shelves, books—feel familiar because we used to spend a lot of time in physical bookstores, and indeed, the comment from just about everyone who approached the table was “are these for sale?”

LotPW contains flip-flop work derived from Flickr, Google Maps, Gmail, Wikipedia and other online repositories of content. The installation of the collection itself is an experiment that plays with expectations about consumption, entertainment and ownership. The books aren’t for sale, and the presentation is slowed-down to the confines of real-time and physical space. The installation is simple, accessible and deliberate; it can’t be “saved for later.” Someone even commented that “books in a wooden box” was a shocking idea, in the context of a web/theory conference. Containing the books within a specially constructed piece of wheeled furniture (a mobile device) is critical; the collection is pushed to the scene and the books are revealed from within the rough cabinet for examination, drawing out the physicality and substance of the material in its presentation.

This focus on the physical is not because I’m interested in some kind of nostalgic idea about what the book used to be. I’m not trying to access something “lost” or better than what’s available online.

Rather, with a group of people spatiotemporally engaged around a collection of web content, each work is able to present its own concept of itself. In this context, the individual book seems less about the web (or less about “webby” qualities) and more about the artist and the physical idea/action at hand (capturing, grabbing, collecting, archiving). And yet, the only thread that connects these 46 works is the web (specifically, the search engine). Once again, the physical book is performative. It acts as a container for an idea, and the printed page both frames its presentation and presents its interface. Does it sound like a reinvention of the book, of sorts? It kind of felt that way. It certainly felt fresh.

There was intense interest in some items more than others. Particularly—

American Psycho by Jason Huff and Mimi Cabell
AutoSummarize by Jason Huff
Occupy Wall Street by Ether-Press
My Apparition of a distance, however near it may be
Other People’s Photographs by Joachim Schmid
Postcards from Google Earth by Clement Valla

Here’s the full inventory, with links to the artists’ websites.

Meanwhile, the collection has already been referenced in the spring exhibition at the Centre des Livres d’Artistes in Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche, France (PDF). I hope to present Library of the Printed Web again soon, at another venue, along with a talk about the emerging web-to-print-based practice.

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Books on wires

There’s Stripped hanging at the Ed Ruscha, Books & Co. show at Gagosian Gallery. The opening was packed and I was happy to see so many friends turn out. This little print-on-demand book that I made in just a few days ended up surrounded by a massive production, and I’m still not entirely sure how it happened. At any rate, it was an honor to be there and see this massive body of work by over a hundred artists connected in time and space by the presence of Mr. Ruscha himself.

The show itself is epic and worth a visit (through April 27, 2013).

Top image—Gagosian Gallery.

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John Cage’s Circle of Influence: October 7–9

Details have been posted for ReViewing Black Mountain College 3 — John Cage’s Circle of Influence, “a 3-day gathering of scholars, performers, and artists presenting ideas and performing works related to John Cage. The weekend program includes music, performances, installations, exhibitions, films and scholarly presentations. Keynote address by Laura Kuhn, Director of the John Cage Trust. Co-sponsored by the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, University of North Carolina at Asheville and the John Cage Trust.”

I’ll be presenting JC273 at John Cage’s Circle of Influence as an installation at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, October 7–9, 2011.

Press releaseschedule and registration.