identity

Share

Gold star

council_logo3.jpg
We’ve had a terrific long-term relationship with the Council on Competitiveness, a non-partisan think-tank in Washington, D.C. They recently agreed to a strategic identity overhaul, so we set out to give them a highly legible graphic system that builds on their existing assets. We retained the gold star that they’ve used for years, but placed it in a new context, with more weight and impact. Times New Roman is out — Akzidenz Grotesk is in. We recommended integrating “Compete” into the identity as a one-word mission statement and a critical call-to-action for its audiences. We’re now systematizing the identity program across a complete range of publications, signage, stationery and website. A totally redesigned Compete.org will launch in December 2007.
council_logo.jpg

Share

Sweetheart

judd_1b.jpg
We collaborated with Nancye Green to create a friendly brand identity for Naomi Judd, who sells her skincare products through direct response marketing (paid television and web). Naomi’s actual signature was our inspiration for the logo, which we applied to products, packaging and print. Calligraphic illustration by Iskra.

Share

Squared

amylau_4.jpg
Amy Lau is an immensely talented interior designer who runs a tight shop here in NYC. We’ve been honored to work with her to create a new identity and collateral materials for her debut at this year’s Kips Bay event. Stationery, photo cards, portfolio boxes and press kits are built around a four-color palette and Gotham. More images soon.

Share

Open Space

OSI_1.jpg
This was one of several concepts for a new identity proposed to the Open Space Institute, an established non-profit land-conservancy in New York. They pursued a different approach, but the punch of these icons still seems appealing.

Share

Enormous in Illinois

sears-logo.jpg
What are the design criteria when proposing a new identity for a $50 billion retail giant that operates 3,800 stores? Creative possibilities were limited, but in the end we were able to push a very imposing and corporate identity — one they had used ubiquitously for 25 years — to a slightly warmer and friendlier place. At the time, we lobbied (unsuccessfully) against the swoosh, a mandate from the client. After a few years they’ve now finally dropped it from national advertising, and I must admit: I miss it.