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Speak Up

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Hey, we were featured on Speak Up yesterday. Speak Up is a fantastic graphic design blog/community founded by Armin Vit — what an honor to appear here as one of his bookmark picks for American design, alongside some truly great work.
Check out the other featured designers:
Helen Yentus
TNOP
Rumors
Arlo (@arlo_design)
End Communications
Jessica Hische

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Twenty-five dead people on Twitter.

I’ve been on Twitter for almost two years but really didn’t start using it seriously until a few months ago. Now I love it, and it’s become a brilliant way to reach out to the design community, among others.
But I’m really hooked on the historical tweets. Poke around and you’ll find a whole bunch of dead people on Twitter, like Susan Sontag, George Washington and Sigmund Freud. It’s fascinating to digest the life’s work of a great thinker in 140 character chunks. Some are like performances — others are really trying to converse in the Twitterverse, “in the voice of” or otherwise. Gandhi just uses the platform to spew quotes. Most fascinating is Charles Darwin, who is tweeting and blogging in real time on board the HMS Beagle (via his 1839 “Voyage of the Beagle” diary).
So here is a list of twenty-five dead people on Twitter. Peruse and enjoy.
Ernest Hemingway
Edgar Allan Poe
William Shakespeare
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Jean Baudrillard
Marshall McLuhan
Susan Sontag
Sigmund Freud
Confucius
Andy Warhol
John Locke
Friedrich Neitzsche
Carl Jung
J.W. von Goethe
Karl Heinrich Marx
Gandhi
Charles Darwin
Walt Whitman
George Washington
William S. Burroughs
Julia Child
Buddha
Albert Einstein
Thomas Jefferson
Jacques Lacan

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Come to DC

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4 million people are descending upon Washington DC for the presidential inauguration. We’re hoping that at least 60 of them will come to our conference: The Inaugural Salon: a gathering on the eve of change. Please join us on January 19, 2009. Chad Evans and I are bringing together brilliant and talented friends and colleagues to share aspirations, question assumptions and engage in conversations about the roles culture, politics, economics, sustainability and the built environment will play in shaping the coming years.
We’re doing it at a gorgeous location on the Potomac — the House of Sweden. All proceeds (registration is $100) will be donated (100%!) to City Year DC, in the spirit of community and grassroots giving we hope our event will inspire.
Join us in DC, and if you can’t, please consider contributing to City Year DC at the Salon site. Thanks.

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The Grid System

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It is, as it says: “The ultimate resource in grid systems.” Freshly launched, by Antonio Carusone, of AisleOne. Soulellis Studio is listed under “Inspiration.” Thanks Antonio!

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Information overdose

“For most of human history, there was little chance of overdosing on information, because any one day in the Olduvai Gorge was a lot like any other. Today, though, we can find in the course of a few hours online more information than our ancient ancestors could in their whole lives.” (WSJ)

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A very nice typeface

omnes.jpg Lest anyone think that we only use typefaces designed before 1965 at Soulellis Studio, I’d like to take a moment to introduce you to Omnes, a fine rounded typeface by Brooklyn-based Joshua Darden. We’re proposing Omnes as the primary typeface for a new identity this week and hoping the client agrees that it’s exactly the right kind of friendly for a serious NYC non-profit.
UPDATE ā€” The client chose the *other* concept, so we’ll be using Hoefler & Frere-Jones’ Knockout.

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Elastic

scale2-01-2-2.jpgI’m itching to get to MoMA to see Design and the Elastic Mind. Meanwhile, the online exhibition is worth perusing, and seeing GoogleEarth figure so prominently reminds me that I should post something here about the incredible work produced in our MArch2 design studio last semester at Cornell. We asked the students to explore the work of Flusser, and use a framework of disjuncture and network to propose ideas about “the city” in Google Earth. Pictured here is an image from the work of Jinang Yang ā€” a sort of mirror-image brand city floating above Chicago.

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The History of Visual Communication

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An incredible web resource: Elif Ayiter’s beautifully designed history of visual communication ā€” from cave paintings to Gutenberg to Maeda. (Pictured: a spread from Bradbury Thompson’s Westvaco Books, 1940sā€“50s.)
That last link, by the way, goes to another one of my favorite image resources: Alki1′s collection on Flickr. She’s 80 years old and totally inspiring.